Pat Green

Friends for Hope 13th Annual Benefit Concert

Pat Green

Asleep at the Wheel

Saturday, November 11, 2017

Doors: 6:00 pm / Show: 6:00 pm (event ends at 12:00 am)

Las Palmas Race Park

Mission, TX

$100.00

Includes entertainment, dinner & drinks.

Pat Green
Pat Green
Pat Green has finally come full circle -- and all the way back Home.

After rising through Texas' college-town and dancehall scene years ago, Green earned himself major-label support in Nashville and became the poster child of Texas music for a whole generation of fans. His list of achievements includes over 2 million albums sold, three Grammy nominations and a sold out Houston Astrodome.

But after releasing six albums in eight years, sending singles like "Wave on Wave" and "Let Me" up the charts, touring with powerhouses like Kenny Chesney and Keith Urban and dealing with accusations of "selling out," the meat grinder of mainstream stardom proved to be too much. He was spent.

"I felt so much pressure during the years I was with the big record labels to put out a record almost every year," he explains. "There was a constant loop of having to be creative with new music, and that's just not my style. I like it to happen when it happens."

Now, after breaking the cycle for a three-year recharge, Green is back in his comfort zone and playing by his own rules again. His is new independent album Home is his first set of originals in several years, and directly speaks to the hardcore fans that have been with him since the beginning.

Featuring a mature country sound that is both modern and exposes his roots for all to see, his new tunes are full of ringing acoustic guitars, slippery steel and dobro, wailing fiddles and heartfelt, personal lyrics, making Home the return to form many fans have been waiting for.

"I'm very comfortable with this record, it came out exactly as I wanted it," Green says.

Produced by the all-star team of Jon Randall Stewart, Justin Pollard and Gary Paczosa, the album captures some of the unbridled energy of his first three self-released projects.

"It's not too over-the-top produced, and it's not bare bones," says Green. "It grooves well, you can turn it up or you can leave it down. It’s a very comfortable spot."

Of 13 new songs, Green co-wrote seven with big names like Scooter Carusoe, Liz Rose and Chris Stapleton, while six more were pulled from A-listers like Jessi Alexander, Brett and Jim Beavers, Chuck Cannon, Shane McAnally and Josh Osborne.

The album begins with the title track, boldly tackling the singer's contentious mainstream rise and any lingering naysayers right off the bat. Green doesn't regret taking his shot at the big time -- and says he had a lot of fun doing it -- but he does understand why some fans felt left out in the cold.

"I was blind to the game, I sang the wrong songs, and disappeared for way too long," he sings. "But I've finally found my way home."

"That song was very, very easy to write," he says. "I was writing with Patrick Davis for a couple of days here in Ft. Worth, and that song was really fast, just because I could hear those lines so easy -- 'Yeah it was fun, we were drunk as sailor's sons' -- we were heroes in our hometown, we were all those things."

With that out of the way, Green gets down to business, laying out a series of songs aimed straight toward his core fan base in the Lone Star state, Oklahoma, Arkansas and Louisiana.

The album's first single, "Girls From Texas," is a prime example, and also features the first of Home's stellar guest appearances. A sugary, grown-up lullaby that explains why Texan girls are just a little bit better than the rest, the track spent 10 weeks on top of the Texas Music chart. Green calls recording the song face-to-face with Lyle Lovett a highlight of the whole project.

"That’s a Jon Randall song," he explains. "He sent it to me and I’ll never forget it. I was on the plane coming home from Louisiana, and he goes 'What do you think about this?' and I literally had chills all over my body. I was like 'I’ll cut that son of a gun right now!'"

"While I Was Away," the project's second single, will strike a chord with anyone who leaves his or her family behind to travel for work. Written by Zane Williams, it's a tearjerker of the highest caliber -- one that even Green has trouble getting through.

"It's just such a ringing truth," says the father of two. "Everyone says 'That got me. This thing made me cry. God dang, why'd you have to do that?'"

For lighter fare, Delbert McClinton and Lee Roy Parnell guest on "May the Good Times Never End." With a twisting, generation-spanning storyline, it features a hot-rod beat and Parnell's burning slide guitar, as well as McClinton' rabble-rousing vocals and harmonica.

"Break It Back Down" speaks to Green's new outlook on life and music, while "No One Here But Us" brings in Sarah Buxton to tell a steamy tale of desperate romance. Meanwhile, "Right Now" is a broken-hearted duet with Sheryl Crow that tells the unflattering-but-true story of Green dumping his now-wife on Valentine's Day.

"I was 22 years old and she was 21, I was ready to move on from Texas Tech and get to Austin and whatever was next," he says. "It was the biggest mistake of my life, but at the same time it paid off, because once I realized it was a mistake, I knew our love was the real thing."

And finally, "Good Night In New Orleans" ends the project on a high note, featuring a celebratory storyline and Louisiana-native Marc Broussard for added Cajun authenticity.

"I kind of have a standard rule to start and finish strong," Green laughs. "The story behind it is great, and everything about that song is cool and fun and funny to me. Everybody around here loves a trip to New Orleans."

According to Green his time off was very much needed, but even though he always intended to return, it still feels like a risk.

"There's a lot of fear, of course, and a lot of 'Is anybody interested? Has the landscape changed so much that I can't have an impact?'" he admits. "It's a mix of excitement and fear, but it’s a welcome challenge."

Mainstream country may have changed, but Green is back in his groove, back to loving and making music on his own terms and happier than ever. And that's a recipe for a comeback of epic proportions.

"I think I'm having the best year of my life," he says. "I feel happy and I feel smarter now. I look back and I wish I could go back in time and tell myself to slow down a little bit, but the truth is life is just enjoying the passing of time, as James Taylor says. There's a lot of drama and there's mistakes and you've gotta get through all of it to get to what you're looking for."

What he was looking for was right at Home all along
Asleep at the Wheel
Asleep at the Wheel
Asleep at the Wheel has seen miles and miles of Texas. They got their kicks on Route 66. And, in 2010, the band clicked another milestone on the odometer – their 40th anniversary. Now in their 41st year, the band continues to introduce the western swing genre to a new generation on tour and takes audiences on the ride of a lifetime with their play, "A Ride with Bob."
"It's been an amazing ride. From Paw Paw to San Francisco to Austin, we've seen it all," says Wheel front man Ray Benson. "But, rest assured, there is still so many exciting projects in the works. The Wheel keeps rolling!"

The Wheel Gets Rolling
"there's some relatively unknown group around that I really dig.
Asleep at the Wheel plays great country music."
Van Morrison Rolling Stone Interview (1973)

It all started when Ray Benson, Floyd Domino, and Lucky Oceans, along with a Vermont farm boy named Leroy Preston; Virginian Chris O'Connell; and Gene Dobkin, a bass player and fellow classmate of Benson's from Antioch College in Yellow Springs, Ohio, joined forces. They began with a simple goal: to play and help revive American roots music.
Asleep at the Wheel landed a gig opening for Alice Cooper and Hot Tuna in Washington, DC in 1970. At the height of Vietnam, many Americans were using their choice of music to express their stance on the conflict in southeast Asia. "We wanted to break that mold," said Benson. "We were concerned more with this amazing roots music, which we felt was being lost amid the politics. We were too country for the rock folks and we were too long-haired for the country folks. But everybody got over it once the music started playing."
A year later, they were coaxed into moving to California by Commander Cody, leader of Commander Cody & His Lost Planet Airmen. But, the band's big break came when Van Morrison mentioned them in an interview with Rolling Stone. The record offers started coming in and The Wheel got rolling.

80+ But Who's Counting?
"We're a dance band. That's what we're about. And that's plenty."
Ray Benson

The musicianship of Asleep at the Wheel has become the stuff of legends. Reuter's pegged The Wheel as "one of the best live acts in the business." Taking a page from Bob Wills' book, the band has constantly toured at a national level throughout its history; with anywhere from 7-15 of the finest players Ray Benson could talk into jumping in the bus to play a string of dates. The alumni roster is well over 80+ members, and includes an impressive list of musicians who have gone on to perform with artists such as Bob Dylan, Van Morrison, Lyle Lovett, Ryan Adams, and many more. A quick scan of awards, such as "Touring Band of the Year" (CMAs, 1976) and "Lifetime Achievement in Performance" (Americana Music Awards 2009), not to mention near dominance of the GRAMMY "Country Instrumental" category over the years, reflects the reputation of the band's musicianship. Ray Benson fell in love with western swing because of its unique combination of elements of American blues, swing and traditional fiddling but also for its demanding musical chops. Western swing is what Benson calls "jazz with a cowboy hat," is a thrill to hear live, and thanks in large part to the Wheel's 40 years of promotion, is a living and creative genre of music today.

On the Records
"Everything this act has ever released is simply spectacular."
Billboard Magazine (2010)

Over their history, Asleep at The Wheel has garnered nine GRAMMY Awards and released more than 25 studio and live albums, and there is no sign of slowing down any time soon. Just last year they earned a Grammy nomination in the newly minted Best Americana Album category for their critically acclaimed Willie & The Wheel, on Bismeaux Records. Most recently, another collaborative project paired the band with the legendary lead from Bob Wills & The Texas Playboys, Leon Rausch. The distinguished velvety vocals that voiced the King of western swing partnered with "post-modern kings of Texas Swing" on It's A Good Day, which USA Today called, "swing from the heavens." It was Leon who first suggested to Ray in the 1970's that The Wheel record Get Your Kicks (on Route 66). The Wheel has now recorded the hit 4 times in 4 different decades, with this latest version featuring Leon.

The Play is The Thing
"The most entertaining night in Texas."
-Liz Smith

The Broadway-scale musical that started as a commemoration of Bob Will's 100th birthday in 2005 now marks its own milestone in 2010; 5 years. Ray Benson and Ann Rapp co-wrote the first-ever musical drama about Benson's idol, entitled "A Ride with Bob: The Bob Wills Musical." At the core of the story is the conversation Ray intended to have when he was invited to meet with Wills in 1974, fresh off the Wheel's release of "Take Me Back to Tulsa." Unfortunately, that meeting never happened as Mr. Wills took ill and never recovered. For the last five years, the play has presented an inspired look into the life, loves and music of the colorful Bob Wills in performances across Texas and from San Francisco to Washington DC. Immediately embraced by western swing fans, this unique presentation has achieved cult-status amongst fans who can't get enough. This year "A Ride with Bob" continued its tour with performances in Abilene, Richardson and in Austin, September 17 and 18 at the Long Center.
True to Asleep at the Wheel's original vision, the play isn't just appealing to core fans. A 2007 interview with The New York Times noted, "the play had another advantage. 'We were reaching a completely new audience,' Mr. Benson said — theatergoers who might never set foot in a beer joint, or even in a cowboy boot."

From Dance Halls to Concert Halls
"A Swinging Symphony"
-Fort Worth Star Telegram

Any band that spends upwards of 250 days on the road each year is more than likely to have seen its fair share of dives, gin joints, biker bars, clubs, auditoriums, dance halls and the like. The Wheel is no exception. Another place Wheel fans have more recently discovered the music has been in symphony halls. Originally debuted in collaboration with the Austin Symphony, the Wheel has since gone on to present their pops program in select performances across the country, and even released a CD in 2006 of their performance with the Fort Worth Symphony Orchestra.

Throughout their four decades the Wheel has driven the genre to the edge, explored new territories, picked up new passengers along the way and crisscrossed the country to the delight of fans and critics alike. And, even though they're doing "forty," there's no chance of slowing down now.
Venue Information:
Las Palmas Race Park
9809 N Taylor Road
Mission, TX, 78573
http://www.laspalmasracepark.com/